Mellékvíz (Creekside Country)
ongoing series

When the child was a childIt walked with its arms swinging,wanted the brook to be a river,the river to be a torrent,and this puddle to be the sea.
Song of Childhood By Peter Handke
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‘Everything will be better when you grow up, you’ll see’ - this sentence I heard several times during my childhood from my grandfather, then later as a young adult also from my father.
After the Cold War, socialism slowly disintegrated in the Eastern bloc of Europe, and in its place came capitalism with its new promises and opportunities. Generations have come and gone, clinging to a dream that seems to be the same for all ages: prosperity, a secure livelihood, a better life, at least for the next generation. Ideologies have changed, but the dream remains the same.
Related to this dream, waters and waterfronts have always played a prominent role in the history of mankind. The Crayfish-creek, which also has an important historical background, flows through parts of the suburbs and several districts of Budapest, eventually flowing into the Danube, one of the main rivers in Europe.
The area surrounding the creek was formerly made up of bogs and meadows. Once drained, these swampy areas these became farmlands fed by the water of the stream and provided a home as well as hope for livelihood for farmers and stockbreeders. After the frequently flooding creek had been regulated, more and more people settled near it in hopes of starting a new life: pioneers, blue-collar families living in blocks of flats, descendants of farmers. Along came the factories, industrial plants, weekend houses, improvised shelters, blocks of flats.



The ones longing to escape the city, and the ones that were pushed out by it. I felt a strong parallel with the twentieth century immigrants, who, uprooting their lives, flooded North-America in hopes of being part of the promise of the new land: the American Dream. The dream remained, and the mistakes we all make are being repeated.I had to realize that this series is about all of us, not just about a creek - but about our nexuses.
I follow the creek from the city, through the suburbs to its source.This journey is also about the stories and folklore of the people living here - it flows in their blood. Sometimes I feel like an outsider and I try to just observe and not get involved. But the creek is also there in my blood. As a child I was living on the border of the periphery and the headwaters, not far from the creek. The former locations of my life are ever-changing scenes of decline and reconstruction, where it is not always possible to clearly decide what is decaying, what is being built, and which one follows from which.
We all want to take root, be a part of making a dream come true, nurtured from our personal and collective past.But still, how can one take root in the soil and then transform the land so mercilessly or even abandon it?
Along the way, I look for the promises passed down from generation to generation, the traces of the fulfillment of the Hungarian dream - which is also my own.